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US National Marine Sanctuaries @noaasanctuaries Instagram Profile

US National Marine Sanctuaries

@noaasanctuaries

NOAA's National Marine Sanctuaries protect our underwater treasures, covering more than 600,000 square miles from the Florida Keys to American Samoa.

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US National Marine Sanctuaries @noaasanctuaries Instagram Photo / Video — Jun 22, 2017

How can an octopus be so colorful? 🐙 🌈 Many cephalopods have special cells in their skin tissue called chromatophores, which enable them to change color rapidly. A part of their neuromuscular system, these cells receive signals from the environment than an octopus can use to inform color change. Chromatophores can help octopodes like this one in National Marine Sanctuary blend in with their surroundings or flash a warning to predators! Week (Photo: NURC/UNCW/NOAA)

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US National Marine Sanctuaries @noaasanctuaries Instagram Photo / Video — Jun 21, 2017

What better way to celebrate Week than with a stubby squid? 🐙 Last year, we teamed up with to explore the deep ocean in and around National Marine Sanctuary, and spotted this little googly-eyed cephalopod! Though they look like a cross between an octopus and a squid, stubby squid are actually closely related to cuttlefish. They spend their lives on the seafloor, coating themselves in a mucus jacket and burrowing into the sediment. Leaving just those big eyes peeking above the surface, they remain buried until prey items like shrimp or small fish -- or a curious ROV -- pass by. (Photo: OET/NOAA)

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US National Marine Sanctuaries @noaasanctuaries Instagram Photo / Video — Jun 20, 2017

Celebrate Week 🐙 with this common octopus in Keys National Marine Sanctuary!

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US National Marine Sanctuaries @noaasanctuaries Instagram Photo / Video — Jun 20, 2017

Summer is a great time to enjoy all things strawberry — including strawberry anemones! At National Marine Sanctuary, these inch-wide anemones carpet the sea floor. They use their tentacles to capture food and to defend themselves. As plentiful as they are, we doubt they'd taste great in a strawberry shortcake. (Photo: NOAA)

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US National Marine Sanctuaries @noaasanctuaries Instagram Photo / Video — Jun 19, 2017

Submersibles and other technology help scientists get up close to historical and biological artifacts! Here, National Marine Sanctuary maritime archaeologist Joe Hoyt examines the wreck of the German U-boat U-576 from inside a two-person submersible. Last summer, Joe and other archaeologists explored the remains of this World War II convoy battlefield. Get the details at the link in our profile. (Photo: Robert Carmichael/Project Baseline, Battle of the Atlantic Expedition)

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US National Marine Sanctuaries @noaasanctuaries Instagram Photo / Video — Jun 18, 2017

Happy sDay from your National Marine Sanctuary System! The animal kingdom is filled with exemplary father figures — the seaweed blennies at National Marine Sanctuary are no exception! Female blennies deposit their eggs in the nooks and crannies of the reef. Then, males keep an eye on the eggs until they hatch! (Photo: Greg McFall/NOAA)

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US National Marine Sanctuaries @noaasanctuaries Instagram Photo / Video — Jun 17, 2017

Heads up! Krill is thick in National Marine Sanctuary and the humpback whales are there to take advantage. These acrobatic whales travel thousands of miles each year to feed on krill and fish in sanctuary waters. The sanctuary is a perfect spot for whale watching, but make sure to always give whales plenty of space! Watching (Photo: Douglas Croft)

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US National Marine Sanctuaries @noaasanctuaries Instagram Photo / Video — Jun 16, 2017

The California spiny lobsters at National Marine Sanctuary are ready for the weekend! You can find these creatures from central California down to Baja California. Unlike other lobster species, these spiny lobsters lack claws. Instead, they have two long, sensitive antennae! (Photo: Claire Fackler/NOAA)

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US National Marine Sanctuaries @noaasanctuaries Instagram Photo / Video — Jun 15, 2017

This masked booby wants you to know: it's Marine National Monument's 11th anniversary! The monument protects over 580,000 square miles within and around the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Within its waters, you'll find more than 7,000 marine species, including the threatened green turtle, pictured here. Plus, 14 million seabirds representing 22 species visit each year to breed and nest. Week (Photo: Koa Matsuoka)

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US National Marine Sanctuaries @noaasanctuaries Instagram Photo / Video — Jun 14, 2017

The endangered leatherback is the largest turtle -- and one of the largest living reptiles -- in the world. Adult leatherbacks can weigh up to 2,000 pounds and be 6.5 feet in length! Unlike all other species of sea turtle, leatherbacks lack a hard bony shell. Instead, their shell is about 1.5 inches thick and consists of leathery connective tissue overlaying loosely interlocking bones. This one was spotted in National Marine Sanctuary. Week Turtle (Photo: Mark Cotter)

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US National Marine Sanctuaries @noaasanctuaries Instagram Photo / Video — Jun 13, 2017

What's Week without a wee 🐢? Here, a researcher holds a green sea turtle hatchling at French Frigate Shoals in Marine National Monument. Over 90 percent of the Hawaiian population of threatened green turtles travel to French Frigate Shoals for safe nesting. (Photo: James Watt/NOAA)

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US National Marine Sanctuaries @noaasanctuaries Instagram Photo / Video — Jun 12, 2017

It's Sea Turtle Week! 🐢 This loggerhead sea turtle was spotted in National Marine Sanctuary. Loggerheads get their names for their relatively large heads, which support powerful jaws and enable them to feed on hard-shelled prey. Week (Photo: G.P. Schmahl/NOAA)

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