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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 5, 2017

The Hubble Space Telescope has some amazing superpowers, specifically when it comes to observing innumerable galaxies flung across time and space. A stunning example is a galaxy cluster called Abell 370. Located approximately 4 billion light-years away, this galaxy cluster contains an assortment of several hundred galaxies tied together by the mutual pull of gravity. Photographed in a combination of visible and near-infrared light, the brightest and largest galaxies are the yellow-white, massive, elliptical galaxies containing many hundreds of billions of stars EACH! Spiral galaxies have younger populations of stars and are bluish. Mysterious-looking arcs of blue light are distorted images of remote galaxies behind the cluster. The cluster acts as a huge lens in space that magnifies and stretches images of background galaxies like a funhouse mirror. Credits: NASA/ESA/STScI cluster telescope year hubble

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — Apr 29, 2017

In space, being outshone is an occupational hazard. This Hubble Space Telescope image captures a galaxy named NGC 7250. Despite being remarkable in its own right — it has bright bursts of star formation and recorded supernova explosions— it blends into the background somewhat thanks to the gloriously bright star hogging the limelight next to it. The bright object seen in this Hubble image is a single and little-studied star named TYC 3203-450-1, located in the constellation of Lacerta (The Lizard). The star is much closer than the much more distant galaxy. Only this way can a normal star outshine an entire galaxy, consisting of billions of stars. Astronomers studying distant objects call these stars “foreground stars” and they are often not very happy about them, as their bright light is contaminating the faint light from the more distant and interesting objects they actually want to study. Credits: ESA/Hubble & NASA

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — Nov 26, 2016

NGC 1222, seen in this image taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 on board the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is a galaxy with a rather eventful story to tell. NGC 1222 has been described as a peculiar example of a type of galaxy known as a lenticular galaxy. Astronomers think that NGC 1222 is in the process of swallowing up two much smaller dwarf galaxies that strayed too close to it. It is likely that the encounter was the trigger for the starburst in NGC 1222, bringing in fresh supplies of gas that are now fueling the burst of star formation.  Happy folks!  Image credit: ESA/NASA

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — Sep 18, 2016

Getting ready for Latin American Regional International Astronomical Union Meeting in

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — Aug 8, 2016

WHERE CAN YOU SPOT HUBBLE? Since its launch in 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope has sent back mind-blowing images that not only changed our understanding of our universe, but also changed where we see glimpses of our universe in everyday life. Hubble is more than a science spacecraft; it’s a cultural phenomenon! Take a moment to think about where you’ve seen the Hubble Space Telescope or Hubble images in your daily life. Maybe you own a textbook with a picture of the telescope on the cover, or you walk by a mural inspired by Hubble images every day on your way to work. Perhaps you’ve even created art based on Hubble images. We want to see the Hubble impact in your life! Share your photos with us on Instagram, Twitter, Flickr and Facebook. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Joy Ng Music credit: "Lions and Lambs" by Jordan Baum, Michael McNamara, Nicholas Furlong, and Travis Margis - Killer Tracks BMI and Soundcast Music SESAC How to ! There are four social media platforms that you can use to submit your work. Flickr: Submit your photos to the Spot Hubble Flickr Group Instagram: Use the Instagram app to upload your photo, and in the description include and Twitter: Share your image on Twitter and include in the tweet Facebook: Share your image on Facebook and include in the post If a image catches our eye, we may share your post on our NASA Hubble social media accounts.

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — Jul 29, 2016

Puzzle 3D Metal Model.

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — Jan 19, 2017

Metal Earth Hubble Space Telescope

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — Dec 12, 2016

London Science Museum

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 26, 2017

Galaxies have road rage? ✨✨✨ ・・・ Although appearing as one object, this image shows two galaxies rushing past each other at about 1,243,000 miles per hour! This speed is most likely too fast for them to merge and form a single galaxy. However, because of their small separation of only about 20,000 light-years, the galaxies will distort one another through the force of gravity while passing each other, changing their structures on a grand scale. Such galactic interactions are a common sight for Hubble, and have long been a field of study for astronomers. The intriguing behaviors of interacting galaxies take many forms; galactic cannibalism, galaxy harassment and even galaxy collisions. The Milky Way itself will eventually fall victim to the latter, merging with the Andromeda Galaxy in about 4.5 billion years. The fate of our galaxy shouldn’t be alarming though: while galaxies are populated by billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so large that hardly any stellar collisions will occur. Credit: ESA/NASA cluster telescope year hubble

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 21, 2017
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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 17, 2017

・・・ The Hubble Space Telescope has some amazing superpowers, specifically when it comes to observing innumerable galaxies flung across time and space. A stunning example is a galaxy cluster called Abell 370. Located approximately 4 billion light-years away, this galaxy cluster contains an assortment of several hundred galaxies tied together by the mutual pull of gravity. Photographed in a combination of visible and near-infrared light, the brightest and largest galaxies are the yellow-white, massive, elliptical galaxies containing many hundreds of billions of stars EACH! Spiral galaxies have younger populations of stars and are bluish. Mysterious-looking arcs of blue light are distorted images of remote galaxies behind the cluster. The cluster acts as a huge lens in space that magnifies and stretches images of background galaxies like a funhouse mirror. Credits: NASA/ESA/STScI cluster telescope year hubble

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 17, 2017

Tek bir cisim gibi görünmesine rağmen birbirinin içinden geçen iki galaksi. Öyle hızlılar ki birleşip tek galaksi olmaları mümkün değil. Saatte 1 milyon 243 bin km hızla geçiyorlar. from 🔀🔀🔀🔀🔀🔀🔀🔀🔀🔀🔀 Although appearing as one object, this image shows two galaxies rushing past each other at about 1,243,000 miles per hour! This speed is most likely too fast for them to merge and form a single galaxy. However, because of their small separation of only about 20,000 light-years, the galaxies will distort one another through the force of gravity while passing each other, changing their structures on a grand scale. Such galactic interactions are a common sight for Hubble, and have long been a field of study for astronomers. The intriguing behaviors of interacting galaxies take many forms; galactic cannibalism, galaxy harassment and even galaxy collisions. The Milky Way itself will eventually fall victim to the latter, merging with the Andromeda Galaxy in about 4.5 billion years. The fate of our galaxy shouldn’t be alarming though: while galaxies are populated by billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so large that hardly any stellar collisions will occur. Credit: ESA/NASA cluster telescope year hubble

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 16, 2017

( ) ・・・ In space, being outshone is an occupational hazard. This Hubble Space Telescope image captures a galaxy named NGC 7250. Despite being remarkable in its own right — it has bright bursts of star formation and recorded supernova explosions— it blends into the background somewhat thanks to the gloriously bright star hogging the limelight next to it. The bright object seen in this Hubble image is a single and little-studied star named TYC 3203-450-1, located in the constellation of Lacerta (The Lizard). The star is much closer than the much more distant galaxy. Only this way can a normal star outshine an entire galaxy, consisting of billions of stars. Astronomers studying distant objects call these stars “foreground stars” and they are often not very happy about them, as their bright light is contaminating the faint light from the more distant and interesting objects they actually want to study. Credits: ESA/Hubble & NASA

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 15, 2017

from - Although appearing as one object, this image shows two galaxies rushing past each other at about 1,243,000 miles per hour! This speed is most likely too fast for them to merge and form a single galaxy. However, because of their small separation of only about 20,000 light-years, the galaxies will distort one another through the force of gravity while passing each other, changing their structures on a grand scale. Such galactic interactions are a common sight for Hubble, and have long been a field of study for astronomers. The intriguing behaviors of interacting galaxies take many forms; galactic cannibalism, galaxy harassment and even galaxy collisions. The Milky Way itself will eventually fall victim to the latter, merging with the Andromeda Galaxy in about 4.5 billion years. The fate of our galaxy shouldn’t be alarming though: while galaxies are populated by billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so large that hardly any stellar collisions will occur. Credit: ESA/NASA cluster telescope year hubble -

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 15, 2017

Although appearing as one object, this image shows two galaxies rushing past each other at about 1,243,000 miles per hour! This speed is most likely too fast for them to merge and form a single galaxy. However, because of their small separation of only about 20,000 light-years, the galaxies will distort one another through the force of gravity while passing each other, changing their structures on a grand scale. Such galactic interactions are a common sight for Hubble, and have long been a field of study for astronomers. The intriguing behaviors of interacting galaxies take many forms; galactic cannibalism, galaxy harassment and even galaxy collisions. The Milky Way itself will eventually fall victim to the latter, merging with the Andromeda Galaxy in about 4.5 billion years. The fate of our galaxy shouldn’t be alarming though: while galaxies are populated by billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so large that hardly any stellar collisions will occur. Credit: ESA/NASA cluster telescope year hubble

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 15, 2017

Although appearing as one object, this image shows two galaxies rushing past each other at about 1,243,000 miles per hour! This speed is most likely too fast for them to merge and form a single galaxy. However, because of their small separation of only about 20,000 light-years, the galaxies will distort one another through the force of gravity while passing each other, changing their structures on a grand scale. Such galactic interactions are a common sight for Hubble, and have long been a field of study for astronomers. The intriguing behaviors of interacting galaxies take many forms; galactic cannibalism, galaxy harassment and even galaxy collisions. The Milky Way itself will eventually fall victim to the latter, merging with the Andromeda Galaxy in about 4.5 billion years. The fate of our galaxy shouldn’t be alarming though: while galaxies are populated by billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so large that hardly any stellar collisions will occur. Credit: ESA/NASA cluster telescope year hubble

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 15, 2017

'What signs of your Lord do you continue to deny'. Verse from Chapter: The Merciful, Holy Quran Although appearing as one object, this image shows two galaxies rushing past each other at about 1,243,000 miles per hour! This speed is most likely too fast for them to merge and form a single galaxy. However, because of their small separation of only about 20,000 light-years, the galaxies will distort one another through the force of gravity while passing each other, changing their structures on a grand scale. Such galactic interactions are a common sight for Hubble, and have long been a field of study for astronomers. The intriguing behaviors of interacting galaxies take many forms; galactic cannibalism, galaxy harassment and even galaxy collisions. The Milky Way itself will eventually fall victim to the latter, merging with the Andromeda Galaxy in about 4.5 billion years. The fate of our galaxy shouldn’t be alarming though: while galaxies are populated by billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so large that hardly any stellar collisions will occur. Credit: ESA/NASA cluster telescope year hubble

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 15, 2017

from - Although appearing as one object, this image shows two galaxies rushing past each other at about 1,243,000 miles per hour! This speed is most likely too fast for them to merge and form a single galaxy. However, because of their small separation of only about 20,000 light-years, the galaxies will distort one another through the force of gravity while passing each other, changing their structures on a grand scale. Such galactic interactions are a common sight for Hubble, and have long been a field of study for astronomers. The intriguing behaviors of interacting galaxies take many forms; galactic cannibalism, galaxy harassment and even galaxy collisions. The Milky Way itself will eventually fall victim to the latter, merging with the Andromeda Galaxy in about 4.5 billion years. The fate of our galaxy shouldn’t be alarming though: while galaxies are populated by billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so large that hardly any stellar collisions will occur. Credit: ESA/NASA cluster telescope year hubble -

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 15, 2017

🚀 너의 장미꽃을 그렇게 소중하게 만드는 건 그 꽃을 위해 네가 소비한 시간이야🌹 Il est le temps que tu as perdu pour ta rose qui fait ta rose si importante🌌 ・・・ Although appearing as one object, this image shows two galaxies rushing past each other at about 1,243,000 miles per hour! This speed is most likely too fast for them to merge and form a single galaxy. However, because of their small separation of only about 20,000 light-years, the galaxies will distort one another through the force of gravity while passing each other, changing their structures on a grand scale. Such galactic interactions are a common sight for Hubble, and have long been a field of study for astronomers. The intriguing behaviors of interacting galaxies take many forms; galactic cannibalism, galaxy harassment and even galaxy collisions. The Milky Way itself will eventually fall victim to the latter, merging with the Andromeda Galaxy in about 4.5 billion years. The fate of our galaxy shouldn’t be alarming though: while galaxies are populated by billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so large that hardly any stellar collisions will occur. Credit: ESA/NASA cluster telescope year hubble

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 14, 2017

Regram from - Although appearing as one object, this image shows two galaxies rushing past each other at about 1,243,000 miles per hour! This speed is most likely too fast for them to merge and form a single galaxy. However, because of their small separation of only about 20,000 light-years, the galaxies will distort one another through the force of gravity while passing each other, changing their structures on a grand scale. Such galactic interactions are a common sight for Hubble, and have long been a field of study for astronomers. The intriguing behaviors of interacting galaxies take many forms; galactic cannibalism, galaxy harassment and even galaxy collisions. The Milky Way itself will eventually fall victim to the latter, merging with the Andromeda Galaxy in about 4.5 billion years. The fate of our galaxy shouldn’t be alarming though: while galaxies are populated by billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so large that hardly any stellar collisions will occur. Credit: ESA/NASA cluster telescope year hubble -

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 14, 2017

regram Although appearing as one object, this image shows two galaxies rushing past each other at about 1,243,000 miles per hour! This speed is most likely too fast for them to merge and form a single galaxy. However, because of their small separation of only about 20,000 light-years, the galaxies will distort one another through the force of gravity while passing each other, changing their structures on a grand scale. Such galactic interactions are a common sight for Hubble, and have long been a field of study for astronomers. The intriguing behaviors of interacting galaxies take many forms; galactic cannibalism, galaxy harassment and even galaxy collisions. The Milky Way itself will eventually fall victim to the latter, merging with the Andromeda Galaxy in about 4.5 billion years. The fate of our galaxy shouldn’t be alarming though: while galaxies are populated by billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so large that hardly any stellar collisions will occur. Credit: ESA/NASA cluster telescope year hubble

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 14, 2017

( ) ・・・ Although appearing as one object, this image shows two galaxies rushing past each other at about 1,243,000 miles per hour! This speed is most likely too fast for them to merge and form a single galaxy. However, because of their small separation of only about 20,000 light-years, the galaxies will distort one another through the force of gravity while passing each other, changing their structures on a grand scale. Such galactic interactions are a common sight for Hubble, and have long been a field of study for astronomers. The intriguing behaviors of interacting galaxies take many forms; galactic cannibalism, galaxy harassment and even galaxy collisions. The Milky Way itself will eventually fall victim to the latter, merging with the Andromeda Galaxy in about 4.5 billion years. The fate of our galaxy shouldn’t be alarming though: while galaxies are populated by billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so large that hardly any stellar collisions will occur. Credit: ESA/NASA cluster telescope year hubble

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on Hastag #spothubble Instagram Photo — May 14, 2017

from - Although appearing as one object, this image shows two galaxies rushing past each other at about 1,243,000 miles per hour! This speed is most likely too fast for them to merge and form a single galaxy. However, because of their small separation of only about 20,000 light-years, the galaxies will distort one another through the force of gravity while passing each other, changing their structures on a grand scale. Such galactic interactions are a common sight for Hubble, and have long been a field of study for astronomers. The intriguing behaviors of interacting galaxies take many forms; galactic cannibalism, galaxy harassment and even galaxy collisions. The Milky Way itself will eventually fall victim to the latter, merging with the Andromeda Galaxy in about 4.5 billion years. The fate of our galaxy shouldn’t be alarming though: while galaxies are populated by billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so large that hardly any stellar collisions will occur. Credit: ESA/NASA cluster telescope year hubble -

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