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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 26, 2017

The Elephant’s Trunk Nebula (IC 1396A) is an elongated dark globule of more than 20 light-years long within the much larger (over 100 light-years across) emission nebula IC 1396 which is located about 2,400 light-years away in the northern constellation of Cepheus (named after the King of Aethiopia in Greek mythology). It was given this name as it resembles the head and trunk of an elephant. The globule is a condensation of dense gas and dust that is being compressed by the intense radiation and stellar winds from the very bright, massive star HD 206267. The compression of the gas in the globule is triggering the formation of stars within it. The stellar winds from the massive star are also responsible for sculpting and eroding the filaments of the globule. These winds produce a dense circular rim making up the “head” of the globule and a swept-back tail of gas. The dark globule is seen in silhouette in visible-light pictures, backlit by the illumination of HD 206267 which is located to the west of the “head”. The Elephant’s Trunk nebula is a site of star formation. Over 250 young stars in and around the Elephant’s Trunk are identified. Several very young (less than 100,000 years old) stars and two older (but still young, a couple of million years) stars are present in a small, circular cavity in the head of the globule. Winds from these young stars may have emptied the cavity. Very young protostars, still accreting material from the surrounding nebula, are located inside the cloud, while fully formed stars have been found just in front of the rims. This suggests that star formation has been proceeding sequentially through the cloud as a result of the ‘triggering’ effects of the hot star. On the order of 5% of the mass of gas and dust in the cloud has already been turned into protostars, and the process is continuing today. Image Credit: Lóránd Fényes, Best Newcomer in the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 Competition

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 27, 2017

And finally, the humpty-dumptying back together has begun again! ✨✨ art e art painting

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 24, 2017

⭕☸❇✴*'-.⚛ ⚛.-'*✴❇☸⭕

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 10, 2017

Crab Nebula in technicolor! This new composite view combines data from five different telescopes, showing the celestial object in multiple kinds of light. Swipe to explore the wavelengths! The view starts with a composite image of the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant that was assembled by combining data from five telescopes spanning nearly the entire breadth of the electromagnetic spectrum: the Very Large Array, the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope, the XMM-Newton Observatory, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. It then moves to the red-colored radio-light view that shows how a neutron star’s fierce “wind” of charged particles from the central neutron star energized the nebula, causing it to emit the radio waves. The yellow-colored infrared image includes the glow of dust particles absorbing ultraviolet and visible light. The green-colored Hubble visible-light image offers a very sharp view of hot filamentary structures that permeate this nebula. The blue-colored ultraviolet image and the purple-colored X-ray image shows the effect of an energetic cloud of electrons driven by a rapidly rotating neutron star at the center of the nebula. Credits: NASA/ESA/NRAO/AUI/NSF

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 26, 2017

Packed and ready to go for Art on the Dock, Kennisis Lake, Haliburton, Ontario. July 8 and 9.

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 27, 2017

And finally, the humpty-dumptying back together has begun again! ✨✨ art e art painting

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 27, 2017

( ) ・・・ Crab Nebula in technicolor! This new composite view combines data from five different telescopes, showing the celestial object in multiple kinds of light. Swipe to explore the wavelengths! The view starts with a composite image of the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant that was assembled by combining data from five telescopes spanning nearly the entire breadth of the electromagnetic spectrum: the Very Large Array, the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope, the XMM-Newton Observatory, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. It then moves to the red-colored radio-light view that shows how a neutron star’s fierce “wind” of charged particles from the central neutron star energized the nebula, causing it to emit the radio waves. The yellow-colored infrared image includes the glow of dust particles absorbing ultraviolet and visible light. The green-colored Hubble visible-light image offers a very sharp view of hot filamentary structures that permeate this nebula. The blue-colored ultraviolet image and the purple-colored X-ray image shows the effect of an energetic cloud of electrons driven by a rapidly rotating neutron star at the center of the nebula. Credits: NASA/ESA/NRAO/AUI/NSF

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 26, 2017

We ❤️ profiles of great nonprofits like this one. ・・・ Explore the universe with : is a branch of that applies the laws of and to explain the birth, life and death of , , , and other objects in the . ☄️

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 26, 2017

The Elephant’s Trunk Nebula (IC 1396A) is an elongated dark globule of more than 20 light-years long within the much larger (over 100 light-years across) emission nebula IC 1396 which is located about 2,400 light-years away in the northern constellation of Cepheus (named after the King of Aethiopia in Greek mythology). It was given this name as it resembles the head and trunk of an elephant. The globule is a condensation of dense gas and dust that is being compressed by the intense radiation and stellar winds from the very bright, massive star HD 206267. The compression of the gas in the globule is triggering the formation of stars within it. The stellar winds from the massive star are also responsible for sculpting and eroding the filaments of the globule. These winds produce a dense circular rim making up the “head” of the globule and a swept-back tail of gas. The dark globule is seen in silhouette in visible-light pictures, backlit by the illumination of HD 206267 which is located to the west of the “head”. The Elephant’s Trunk nebula is a site of star formation. Over 250 young stars in and around the Elephant’s Trunk are identified. Several very young (less than 100,000 years old) stars and two older (but still young, a couple of million years) stars are present in a small, circular cavity in the head of the globule. Winds from these young stars may have emptied the cavity. Very young protostars, still accreting material from the surrounding nebula, are located inside the cloud, while fully formed stars have been found just in front of the rims. This suggests that star formation has been proceeding sequentially through the cloud as a result of the ‘triggering’ effects of the hot star. On the order of 5% of the mass of gas and dust in the cloud has already been turned into protostars, and the process is continuing today. Image Credit: Lóránd Fényes, Best Newcomer in the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 Competition

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 26, 2017

The Ring Nebula: created by a star that died (ran out of fuel). it spans 1 light year and lies 2,000 light years away. it consists of a relatively dense donut-like ring around a cloud of glowing gas. this glowing gas came from a once sun-like star, which is now just a tiny dot of light in the center of the nebula! since it's 2,000 light years away, that means we're seeing what it looked like 2,000 years ago, as that's how long it took for the light to travel here. so it would look a little different now if you were close by it. image: © NASA (Hubble)            e nerd

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 26, 2017

this is the lagoon nebula and it's visible without a telescope. the reason it's glowing pink/red is because of high energy starlight hitting into interstellar hydrogen gas. stars are forming within and its pretty violent. those strips of darkness you see are dark dust filaments that were created in the atmospheres of cool giant stars and the debris of supernovae. it's located around 5,000 light years away, meaning this is what it looked like 5,000 years ago. image: © university of Arizona (Skycenter)           e nerd

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 26, 2017

Tak apalah tempat nya paling belakang sendiri..yg penting dentuman nya paling menggelegar😊😎 band 🎶 ponorogo Tb📷:

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 26, 2017

“Hope believes there are greater forces against you but that there’s a chance you might win out. Hope is wishing. Faith is knowing. The universe is listening.” ― Habib Sadeghi, Within Fantastic shapes lurk in clouds of glowing gas in the giant star forming region NGC 6188. The emission nebula is found about 4,000 light years away near the edge of a large molecular cloud unseen at visible wavelengths, in the southern constellation Ara. Massive, young stars of the embedded Ara OB1 association were formed in that region only a few million years ago, sculpting the dark shapes and powering the nebular glow with stellar winds and intense ultraviolet radiation. The recent star formation itself was likely triggered by winds and supernova explosions, from previous generations of massive stars, that swept up and compressed the molecular gas. Joining NGC 6188 on this cosmic canvas, visible toward the lower right, is rare emission nebula NGC 6164, also created by one of the region's massive O-type stars. Similar in appearance to many planetary nebulae, NGC 6164's striking, symmetric gaseous shroud and faint halo surround its bright central star near the bottom edge. The impressively wide field of view spans over 3 degrees (six full Moons), corresponding to over 200 light years at the estimated distance of NGC 6188. Three image sets have been included in the featured composite. e _inc telescope Image Credit & Copyright: Martin Pugh & Rick Stevenson  Text Credit: APOD NASAQ

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 26, 2017

Dad a fun triangle cosmos tattoo!! More like this please!! dust tattoo

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 26, 2017

Packed and ready to go for Art on the Dock, Kennisis Lake, Haliburton, Ontario. July 8 and 9.

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 26, 2017

Packed up and ready for Art on the Dock, Kennisis Lake, Haliburton, Ontario. July 8 and 9.

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on Hastag #nebulae Instagram Photo — May 26, 2017
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