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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 21, 2017

Today for we look at what an inch of water is worth. Our nation’s ports are the lifelines of our economy. In 2016, foreign trades through U.S. ports were valued at $1.5 trillion—$475 billion exports and $1.0 trillion imports were moved by vessels. When goods travel through ports, it means they are traveling via ship. NOS is in the business of making sure that mariners—and the goods they are transporting—make it to their destinations safely and quickly. Just as airplane pilots need to know current weather and ground conditions, ship captains need to know exactly what's going on in the water and in the air. NOS monitoring systems supply mariners with the real-time data they need, providing information such as water levels, wind and current speeds and directions, and water temperature. But what does this have to do with that inch of water? A ship needs a certain amount of water in order to float and not touch bottom. This water depth is called the ship’s “draft.” The more cargo a ship carries, the more the ship will weigh, meaning it will sink more and require more draft. Even a slight decrease in the depth of a waterway will require a ship to reduce the amount of cargo it is carrying. On the flipside, more water means more cargo. This, in turn, translates into fewer trips needed to transport goods. With one more inch of draft, a ship can transport an additional: - 36 John Deere tractors, worth more than $2.4 million - 9,600 laptop computers, valued at $8.5 million - 358,000 pounds of wheat, worth more than $30,000 - 1,540 55-inch televisions, worth approximately $3 million

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 20, 2017

Feeling a bit stuck today? Today's ocean fact explore the nautical term--doldrums--that sailors around the world know for getting stuck on windless waters. Known to sailors around the world as the doldrums, the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone, (ITCZ, pronounced and sometimes referred to as the “itch”), is a belt around the Earth extending approximately five degrees north and south of the equator. Here, the prevailing trade winds of the northern hemisphere blow to the southwest and collide with the southern hemisphere’s driving northeast trade winds. Due to intense solar heating near the equator, the warm, moist air is forced up into the atmosphere like a hot air balloon. As the air rises, it cools, causing persistent bands of showers and storms around the Earth’s midsection. The rising air mass finally subsides in what is known as the horse latitudes, where the air moves downward toward Earth’s surface. Because the air circulates in an upward direction, there is often little surface wind in the ITCZ. That is why sailors well know that the area can becalm sailing ships for weeks. And that’s why they call it the doldrums. fact

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 3, 2016

How far will one wave travel? Get out an explore!

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 1, 2016

June is ! Let's all celebrate by sharing our memories being around the ocean! What is your favorite thing to do in the ocean? Tag us and use the

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 10, 2017

Ocean breathes salty!

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 22, 2017

This wind needs to stop! I need a boat day!

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Nov 24, 2015

This is what happens when you're taking photos and then the sea decides to come in real quick 😂 30 days in the ocean still going strong, having a love affair with the Pacific. 📷:

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 19, 2017

Today's ocean trivia--how much of the ocean have we explored? The ocean is the lifeblood of Earth, covering more than 70 percent of the planet's surface, driving weather, regulating temperature, and ultimately supporting all living organisms. Throughout history, the ocean has been a vital source of sustenance, transport, commerce, growth, and inspiration. Yet for all of our reliance on the ocean, 95 percent of this realm remains unexplored, unseen by human eyes. NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research is leading efforts to explore the ocean by supporting expeditions to investigate and document unknown and poorly known areas of the ocean. These expeditions represent a bold and innovative approach by infusing teams of scientist-explorers with a "Lewis and Clark" spirit of discovery and equipping them with the latest exploration tools. From mapping and describing the physical, biological, geological, chemical, and archaeological aspects of the ocean to understanding ocean dynamics, developing new technologies, and helping us all unlock the secrets of the ocean, NOAA is working to increase our understanding of the ocean realm. exploration

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 20, 2017

Historic shipwrecks. Colorful coral reefs. Amazing marine wildlife. NOAA's national marine sanctuaries and estuarine research reserves offer all this and more to diving enthusiasts in coastal U.S. states and territories. NOAA sanctuaries and reserves are protected areas that help us conserve these special coastal and marine places for future generations, while still enjoying all they have to offer today. Diving is just one of many recreational opportunities available at our these sites. A few tips to help you safely enjoy your diving adventure: -Don't collect underwater souvenirs. Leave these behind for others to enjoy. -Enjoy viewing marine mammals and wildlife from a safe distance. -If you see corals, please don't touch. Keep your fins, gear, and hands away from coral reefs, as this contact can hurt you and will damage delicate coral animals. For more on safe diving practices, visit http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/news/may14/diving.html. In this photo, divers in Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. life

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 22, 2017

There are roughly 2,000 varieties of living in our oceans. About 40 of these species are affected with "sea star wasting syndrome" which is said to be caused by rising ocean temperatures.

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 22, 2017

This wind needs to stop! I need a boat day!

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 21, 2017

Today for we look at what an inch of water is worth. Our nation’s ports are the lifelines of our economy. In 2016, foreign trades through U.S. ports were valued at $1.5 trillion—$475 billion exports and $1.0 trillion imports were moved by vessels. When goods travel through ports, it means they are traveling via ship. NOS is in the business of making sure that mariners—and the goods they are transporting—make it to their destinations safely and quickly. Just as airplane pilots need to know current weather and ground conditions, ship captains need to know exactly what's going on in the water and in the air. NOS monitoring systems supply mariners with the real-time data they need, providing information such as water levels, wind and current speeds and directions, and water temperature. But what does this have to do with that inch of water? A ship needs a certain amount of water in order to float and not touch bottom. This water depth is called the ship’s “draft.” The more cargo a ship carries, the more the ship will weigh, meaning it will sink more and require more draft. Even a slight decrease in the depth of a waterway will require a ship to reduce the amount of cargo it is carrying. On the flipside, more water means more cargo. This, in turn, translates into fewer trips needed to transport goods. With one more inch of draft, a ship can transport an additional: - 36 John Deere tractors, worth more than $2.4 million - 9,600 laptop computers, valued at $8.5 million - 358,000 pounds of wheat, worth more than $30,000 - 1,540 55-inch televisions, worth approximately $3 million

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 21, 2017

・・・ Today's ocean trivia--how much of the ocean have we explored? The ocean is the lifeblood of Earth, covering more than 70 percent of the planet's surface, driving weather, regulating temperature, and ultimately supporting all living organisms. Throughout history, the ocean has been a vital source of sustenance, transport, commerce, growth, and inspiration. Yet for all of our reliance on the ocean, 95 percent of this realm remains unexplored, unseen by human eyes. NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research is leading efforts to explore the ocean by supporting expeditions to investigate and document unknown and poorly known areas of the ocean. These expeditions represent a bold and innovative approach by infusing teams of scientist-explorers with a "Lewis and Clark" spirit of discovery and equipping them with the latest exploration tools. From mapping and describing the physical, biological, geological, chemical, and archaeological aspects of the ocean to understanding ocean dynamics, developing new technologies, and helping us all unlock the secrets of the ocean, NOAA is working to increase our understanding of the ocean realm. exploration

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 21, 2017

Closed Brain Coral (Symphyllia spp.) . Why is this coral red? Corals couldn't survive without housing a symbiotic algae (called zooxanthellae) inside of their tissue. The mix of pigments determines a coral's color and are usually "chosen" for functional reasons - for example, we think pink and purple corals are sunscreened against damaging UV rays. .

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 21, 2017

・・・ Feeling a bit stuck today? Today's ocean fact explore the nautical term--doldrums--that sailors around the world know for getting stuck on windless waters. Known to sailors around the world as the doldrums, the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone, (ITCZ, pronounced and sometimes referred to as the “itch”), is a belt around the Earth extending approximately five degrees north and south of the equator. Here, the prevailing trade winds of the northern hemisphere blow to the southwest and collide with the southern hemisphere’s driving northeast trade winds. Due to intense solar heating near the equator, the warm, moist air is forced up into the atmosphere like a hot air balloon. As the air rises, it cools, causing persistent bands of showers and storms around the Earth’s midsection. The rising air mass finally subsides in what is known as the horse latitudes, where the air moves downward toward Earth’s surface. Because the air circulates in an upward direction, there is often little surface wind in the ITCZ. That is why sailors well know that the area can becalm sailing ships for weeks. And that’s why they call it the doldrums. fact

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 21, 2017

・・・ Historic shipwrecks. Colorful coral reefs. Amazing marine wildlife. NOAA's national marine sanctuaries and estuarine research reserves offer all this and more to diving enthusiasts in coastal U.S. states and territories. NOAA sanctuaries and reserves are protected areas that help us conserve these special coastal and marine places for future generations, while still enjoying all they have to offer today. Diving is just one of many recreational opportunities available at our these sites. A few tips to help you safely enjoy your diving adventure: -Don't collect underwater souvenirs. Leave these behind for others to enjoy. -Enjoy viewing marine mammals and wildlife from a safe distance. -If you see corals, please don't touch. Keep your fins, gear, and hands away from coral reefs, as this contact can hurt you and will damage delicate coral animals. For more on safe diving practices, visit http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/news/may14/diving.html. In this photo, divers in Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. life

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 20, 2017

What's under the sea?

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 20, 2017

Feeling a bit stuck today? Today's ocean fact explore the nautical term--doldrums--that sailors around the world know for getting stuck on windless waters. Known to sailors around the world as the doldrums, the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone, (ITCZ, pronounced and sometimes referred to as the “itch”), is a belt around the Earth extending approximately five degrees north and south of the equator. Here, the prevailing trade winds of the northern hemisphere blow to the southwest and collide with the southern hemisphere’s driving northeast trade winds. Due to intense solar heating near the equator, the warm, moist air is forced up into the atmosphere like a hot air balloon. As the air rises, it cools, causing persistent bands of showers and storms around the Earth’s midsection. The rising air mass finally subsides in what is known as the horse latitudes, where the air moves downward toward Earth’s surface. Because the air circulates in an upward direction, there is often little surface wind in the ITCZ. That is why sailors well know that the area can becalm sailing ships for weeks. And that’s why they call it the doldrums. fact

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 20, 2017

Historic shipwrecks. Colorful coral reefs. Amazing marine wildlife. NOAA's national marine sanctuaries and estuarine research reserves offer all this and more to diving enthusiasts in coastal U.S. states and territories. NOAA sanctuaries and reserves are protected areas that help us conserve these special coastal and marine places for future generations, while still enjoying all they have to offer today. Diving is just one of many recreational opportunities available at our these sites. A few tips to help you safely enjoy your diving adventure: -Don't collect underwater souvenirs. Leave these behind for others to enjoy. -Enjoy viewing marine mammals and wildlife from a safe distance. -If you see corals, please don't touch. Keep your fins, gear, and hands away from coral reefs, as this contact can hurt you and will damage delicate coral animals. For more on safe diving practices, visit http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/news/may14/diving.html. In this photo, divers in Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. life

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 19, 2017

Today's ocean trivia--how much of the ocean have we explored? The ocean is the lifeblood of Earth, covering more than 70 percent of the planet's surface, driving weather, regulating temperature, and ultimately supporting all living organisms. Throughout history, the ocean has been a vital source of sustenance, transport, commerce, growth, and inspiration. Yet for all of our reliance on the ocean, 95 percent of this realm remains unexplored, unseen by human eyes. NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research is leading efforts to explore the ocean by supporting expeditions to investigate and document unknown and poorly known areas of the ocean. These expeditions represent a bold and innovative approach by infusing teams of scientist-explorers with a "Lewis and Clark" spirit of discovery and equipping them with the latest exploration tools. From mapping and describing the physical, biological, geological, chemical, and archaeological aspects of the ocean to understanding ocean dynamics, developing new technologies, and helping us all unlock the secrets of the ocean, NOAA is working to increase our understanding of the ocean realm. exploration

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 18, 2017

Untuk yg masih bertanya oseanografi itu ngapain? Boleh d baca.. ~ with ・・・ Have you ever wondered what an oceanographer does? Oceanography covers a wide range of topics, including marine life and ecosystems, ocean circulation, plate tectonics and the geology of the seafloor, and the chemical and physical properties of the ocean. Just as there are many specialties within the medical field, there are many disciplines within oceanography. - Biological oceanographers and marine biologists study plants and animals in the marine environment. They are interested in the numbers of marine organisms and how these organisms develop, relate to one another, adapt to their environment, and interact with it. - Chemical oceanographers and marine chemists study the composition of seawater, its processes and cycles, and the chemical interaction of seawater with the atmosphere and seafloor. Their work may include analysis of seawater components, the effects of pollutants, and the impacts of chemical processes on marine organisms. - Geological oceanographers and marine geologists explore the ocean floor and the processes that form its mountains, canyons, and valleys. Through sampling, they look at millions of years of history of sea-floor spreading, plate tectonics, and oceanic circulation and climates. - Physical oceanographers study the physical conditions and processes within the ocean such as waves, currents, eddies, gyres and tides; the transport of sand on and off beaches; coastal erosion; and the interactions of the atmosphere and the ocean. ographer jobs

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 18, 2017

Have you ever wondered what an oceanographer does? Oceanography covers a wide range of topics, including marine life and ecosystems, ocean circulation, plate tectonics and the geology of the seafloor, and the chemical and physical properties of the ocean. Just as there are many specialties within the medical field, there are many disciplines within oceanography. - Biological oceanographers and marine biologists study plants and animals in the marine environment. They are interested in the numbers of marine organisms and how these organisms develop, relate to one another, adapt to their environment, and interact with it. - Chemical oceanographers and marine chemists study the composition of seawater, its processes and cycles, and the chemical interaction of seawater with the atmosphere and seafloor. Their work may include analysis of seawater components, the effects of pollutants, and the impacts of chemical processes on marine organisms. - Geological oceanographers and marine geologists explore the ocean floor and the processes that form its mountains, canyons, and valleys. Through sampling, they look at millions of years of history of sea-floor spreading, plate tectonics, and oceanic circulation and climates. - Physical oceanographers study the physical conditions and processes within the ocean such as waves, currents, eddies, gyres and tides; the transport of sand on and off beaches; coastal erosion; and the interactions of the atmosphere and the ocean. ographer jobs

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 18, 2017

[📷 credit: Amanda Waite; seahorse caught & released from R/V ANGARI in Tampa Bay by Oceanography Camp for Girls] via . . . sunday andi atsea

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 18, 2017

It's a bit of a stretch, but I'm combine , and with one of my totally real and non-fictional role models. to all those fabulous pops out there!

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on Hastag #30DaysofOcean Instagram Photo — Jun 18, 2017

Sabían que los desechos plásticos en el océano causan la muerte de 1 millón de aves marinas y más de 100,000 animales marinos cada año? (Fuente: UNESCO) Toda esta basura la encontré caminando a lo largo de no más de 500m de playa. Llené 2 bolsas de súper (que eran también parte de la basura en la arena) de desechos de todo tipo, principalmente plástico. Es preocupante que no nos demos cuenta que cualquier daño a la naturaleza, tarde o temprano, será en perjuicio de nuestra propia existencia. Por favor, seamos conscientes del respeto que debemos a la naturaleza. Hagamos que nuestra interacción con ella sea algo positivo y no algo destructivo. Cuántas vidas de otras especies van a seguir costando sus descuidos? person

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